(via US urges Sri Lanka to act on UN war report - Central & South Asia - Al Jazeera English)
A senior US offical has called on the Sri Lankan government to follow  up on the findings of a UN report, by bringing to justice those who  committed war crimes during the civil war.
Robert Blake, assistant secretary of state for South and Central  Asia, said accountability for alleged war crimes was as important as  dealing with the political issues which remain unsettled after the  government defeated the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE).
"The solution to achieving a just and lasting peace in Sri Lanka is  not just about accountability," Blake, who served as US ambassador to  Sri Lanka at the end of its quarter-century civil war in May 2009, said  on Wednesday in Colombo, the Sri Lankan capital.
"It’s a much wider series of things that have to be addressed, and I think the government is addressing them."
The Indian Ocean nation is facing increased pressure from the West to  probe allegations of war crimes and humanitarian law violations at the  end of its war with Tamil Tigers, who were seeking a separate homeland  in the country’s north-east.
A UN-sponsored report says there is “credible evidence” that tens of thousands of civilians  died in the last months of the war that began in 1983 after decades of  ethnopolitical tension between the Sinhalese majority and Tamil  minority.
Ban Ki-moon, the UN secretary-general, sent the report to the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on Monday.
Sri Lanka has been on a diplomatic offensive to try to dispel the  allegations, which it has long said are biased, exaggerated and fronted  by Tamil Tiger supporters.

(via US urges Sri Lanka to act on UN war report - Central & South Asia - Al Jazeera English)

A senior US offical has called on the Sri Lankan government to follow up on the findings of a UN report, by bringing to justice those who committed war crimes during the civil war.

Robert Blake, assistant secretary of state for South and Central Asia, said accountability for alleged war crimes was as important as dealing with the political issues which remain unsettled after the government defeated the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE).

"The solution to achieving a just and lasting peace in Sri Lanka is not just about accountability," Blake, who served as US ambassador to Sri Lanka at the end of its quarter-century civil war in May 2009, said on Wednesday in Colombo, the Sri Lankan capital.

"It’s a much wider series of things that have to be addressed, and I think the government is addressing them."

The Indian Ocean nation is facing increased pressure from the West to probe allegations of war crimes and humanitarian law violations at the end of its war with Tamil Tigers, who were seeking a separate homeland in the country’s north-east.

A UN-sponsored report says there is “credible evidence” that tens of thousands of civilians died in the last months of the war that began in 1983 after decades of ethnopolitical tension between the Sinhalese majority and Tamil minority.

Ban Ki-moon, the UN secretary-general, sent the report to the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on Monday.

Sri Lanka has been on a diplomatic offensive to try to dispel the allegations, which it has long said are biased, exaggerated and fronted by Tamil Tiger supporters.

(via US urges Sri Lanka to act on UN war report - Central & South Asia - Al Jazeera English)
A senior US offical has called on the Sri Lankan government to follow  up on the findings of a UN report, by bringing to justice those who  committed war crimes during the civil war.
Robert Blake, assistant secretary of state for South and Central  Asia, said accountability for alleged war crimes was as important as  dealing with the political issues which remain unsettled after the  government defeated the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE).
"The solution to achieving a just and lasting peace in Sri Lanka is  not just about accountability," Blake, who served as US ambassador to  Sri Lanka at the end of its quarter-century civil war in May 2009, said  on Wednesday in Colombo, the Sri Lankan capital.
"It’s a much wider series of things that have to be addressed, and I think the government is addressing them."
The Indian Ocean nation is facing increased pressure from the West to  probe allegations of war crimes and humanitarian law violations at the  end of its war with Tamil Tigers, who were seeking a separate homeland  in the country’s north-east.
A UN-sponsored report says there is “credible evidence” that tens of thousands of civilians  died in the last months of the war that began in 1983 after decades of  ethnopolitical tension between the Sinhalese majority and Tamil  minority.
Ban Ki-moon, the UN secretary-general, sent the report to the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on Monday.
Sri Lanka has been on a diplomatic offensive to try to dispel the  allegations, which it has long said are biased, exaggerated and fronted  by Tamil Tiger supporters.

(via US urges Sri Lanka to act on UN war report - Central & South Asia - Al Jazeera English)

A senior US offical has called on the Sri Lankan government to follow up on the findings of a UN report, by bringing to justice those who committed war crimes during the civil war.

Robert Blake, assistant secretary of state for South and Central Asia, said accountability for alleged war crimes was as important as dealing with the political issues which remain unsettled after the government defeated the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE).

"The solution to achieving a just and lasting peace in Sri Lanka is not just about accountability," Blake, who served as US ambassador to Sri Lanka at the end of its quarter-century civil war in May 2009, said on Wednesday in Colombo, the Sri Lankan capital.

"It’s a much wider series of things that have to be addressed, and I think the government is addressing them."

The Indian Ocean nation is facing increased pressure from the West to probe allegations of war crimes and humanitarian law violations at the end of its war with Tamil Tigers, who were seeking a separate homeland in the country’s north-east.

A UN-sponsored report says there is “credible evidence” that tens of thousands of civilians died in the last months of the war that began in 1983 after decades of ethnopolitical tension between the Sinhalese majority and Tamil minority.

Ban Ki-moon, the UN secretary-general, sent the report to the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on Monday.

Sri Lanka has been on a diplomatic offensive to try to dispel the allegations, which it has long said are biased, exaggerated and fronted by Tamil Tiger supporters.

Notes:

  1. notfondofasking reblogged this from uglyreligion
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